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  • Watzin Veterinary Clinic proudly follows a "Fear Free" approach to medicine and Veterinary care. All of the doctors practicing at Watzin Veterinary Clinic are certified 'Fear Free' practitioners. It is very important to us that each individual patient is calm and relaxed during their visit with us. Not only does fear, stress, and anxiety have detrimental effects on the body, but it creates an unpleasant experience for everyone involved. In this article you will find some helpful tips on how to arrive with your cat and dog at the clinic as stress free as possible.

  • Since we want the best for our pets, we should include them in the go green movement. Here are a few ways you can create a cleaner, greener home for you and your pet.

  • An unplanned weight loss of more than 10% of a dog’s body weight is considered abnormal. Weight loss occurs because calories absorbed from the diet do not meet the calories being used by the body. This can occur due to many factors including excessive cold or physical activity, disease states that heighten the metabolic rate, insufficient calories or poor diet, inability to ingest the diet, inability to digest and/or absorb the nutrients in the diet, and loss of nutrients from vomiting, diarrhea, or polyuria. As well as a thorough history and physical exam, testing such as bloodwork, urinalysis, and imaging may be needed to determine the underlying cause in order to institute targeted treatment.

  • The simple description of an abscess is a pocket of pus located somewhere in the body.

  • Acepromazine is used as a sedative and a pre-anesthetic agent. It also possesses the following properties: prevents vomiting, prevents muscle spasms, alleviates itching as a result of skin irritation and decreases temperature. Acepromazine may be used to help manage feline urinary tract disease.

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Paracetamol, APAP, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a pain relief and fever-reducing medicine people use for many types of pain.

  • Acetaminophen is a medication that is used to treat fever and/or pain in humans. Acetaminophen is toxic for dogs, and unfortunately, acetaminophen toxicity in dogs is somewhat common as dog owners attempt to treat their dogs for pain without first consulting with a veterinarian.

  • Acetazolamide is a diuretic used off label and given by mouth to treat glaucoma or alkalosis. The most common side effect is stomach upset, but other side effects of the central nervous system, blood, kidneys, electrolytes, blood sugar levels, liver, or skin are possible. Do not use this medication in pets with liver or kidney disease, or low sodium or potassium blood levels. Use with caution in pets with acidosis, diabetes, pregnancy or lactation. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Acetylcysteine is given by mouth, injection, or topically and is used on and off label to treat toxicities or to break up mucus. It is usually a prescription, but some forms may be found over the counter. Give as directed by your veterinarian. The most common side effect is an upset stomach. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Canine acne is an inflammatory disorder of the lips and the skin of the muzzle. Dogs with mild cases of acne often have red bumps or pustules (pimples) on their skin. In some cases, acne may be associated with underlying skin conditions. There are a variety of treatments that may be used for the treatment of canine acne.