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Birds

  • As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals, and water. Macaws are vulnerable to high cholesterol, atherosclerosis, stroke, vitamin A deficiency, insufficient dietary calcium, egg-binding, and other nutrition-related problems. Seeds are highly palatable and preferred by birds, but nutritionally they are incomplete, lacking vitamins, minerals, and protein. Fruits, vegetables, and greens should account for no more than 20-25% of the daily diet. Pellets are the ideal diet and should ideally represent approximately 75-80% of the bird's diet. Converting seed-eating birds onto a formulated diet is not always easy. Consult your veterinarian if you encounter any problems with this transition or with the health of your bird. In general, a bird that is eating 75-80% of its diet in the form of pelleted food does not need supplements. Macaws do not need gravel or grit because they remove the outer hull of the seed before ingesting the kernel.

  • Mynah birds eat a variety of foods and have relatively short digestive tracts when compared with other parrots. Mynah birds are not seed-eaters in the wild and are omnivorous. Provide your mynah bird with bite-sized pieces of food. Mynah birds are very sensitive to iron levels in their food; therefore, they must be offered pelleted food that is low in iron and certain fruits and vegetables must fed sparingly or not at all. Mynah birds may occasionally enjoy pinky mice or insects such as mealworms, wax worms, crickets and other insects Mynah birds do not require grit or gravel for proper digestion.

  • Our knowledge of bird nutrition is constantly evolving. This is due both to heightened awareness of the importance of nutrition and to increased research into birds different needs. As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals and water. Different species of birds often require different foods.

  • Our knowledge of bird nutrition is constantly evolving. This is due both to heightened awareness of the importance of nutrition and to increased research. As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals and water.

  • Our knowledge of bird nutrition is constantly evolving. This is due both to heightened awareness of the importance of nutrition and to increased research into birds different needs. As with all other animals, birds need a proper balance of carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals and water. Different species of birds often require different foods.

  • The finch is a popular pet bird with a fascinating personality and colorful community life. They originate from various countries around the world. There is a large diversity of species and varieties available in an abundant assortment of colors and patterns.

  • Fluoxetine is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat various behavioral conditions. Common side effects include sleepiness and decreased appetite. Do not use in pets with a history of seizures, that are on medications that lower the seizure threshold, that are allergic to it, taking MAOIs, younger than 6 months old, or aggressive pets. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • It is suggested that a selection of various fruits and vegetables be fed to your bird every day. A good source of carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, fresh produce should comprise no more than 15-30% of the diet. Bright yellow, red, and orange vegetables and fruits, including bell peppers, carrots, sweet potatoes, squash, mango, papaya, and cantaloupe, all contain a great deal of vitamin A which is a critical nutrient in a birds’ diet.

  • Hand-raised babies usually make better pets, as they have been completely socialized with humans. Hand-feeding is a job best left for the experienced bird breeder or aviculturist. If you’re considering hand-feeding a baby bird, you should contact your local bird breeder or veterinarian for help. A chick may be removed from the parents any time before weaning, but many suggest leaving the babies with the parents for up to 3 weeks. Precise temperature and humidity is essential for optimum growth of newly hatched birds. Generally, the temperature can be lowered by one degree every 2-3 days as feathering progresses. If you are raising a chick, always monitor your bird for signs of overheating or chilling. Poor growth or poor digestion (delayed crop emptying) may indicate poor health (including presence of gastrointestinal tract infections), improper consistency/mixing of hand feeding formula, improper temperature of formula, or improper environmental temperature and humidity. There are numerous commercially available hand-feeding formulas for baby birds. All food must be prepared fresh for every feeding. Food retained from one feeding to another is an ideal medium for the growth of harmful bacteria and yeast. Any food prepared or heated in a microwave oven must be mixed thoroughly to ensure that the food’s temperature is uniform. Food that is too hot may cause severe burns to the crop. Food that is too cold may be rejected by the babies or may slow down digestion. The frequency of feeding for young birds is greater than that of older birds. The best indication of a healthy, growing chick is a good, strong feeding response at every feeding, with the crop emptying between feedings, and the regular production of droppings (feces). Weight gain should be monitored and recorded at the same time each day using a scale that weighs in grams with 1-gram increments to detect subtle increases or decreases. As a bird gets older and develops a full complement of feathers, it should be encouraged to wean off formula and to eat more on its own. Birds should be offered a variety of foods, including formulated pelleted diets, as well as fresh fruits and vegetables, at this time to encourage their exploration and experimentation. As this food introduction continues, hand-feeding may be withheld at certain times. All feeding utensils must be cleaned, disinfected, and dried thoroughly between feedings.

  • It is common for owners to have their birds on their shoulders as they go about their day. We are left with our hands free and our little buddies get to spend part of the day with us. Although this seems like a wonderful idea, it is not appropriate in all situations or for all birds.